In the Mood of Matisse – Afterglow

 

In The Mood of Matisse 04/04/2014

In The Mood of Matisse 04/04/2014

Matisse would have been proud of his namesake event that took place at the gallery on the 4th of April 2014. Bill Lowe Gallery hosted an exhilarating evening reception that showcased the work of Parisian painter Pierre-Marie Brisson in his southern debut.  The whimsically named event, “In the Mood of Matisse,” was a kinetic interaction of the multi-faceted crowd punctuated by colorful conversations that seemed to reflect the jubilation of Brisson’s vibrant figurative and organic patterns.  The diverse crowd savored exceptional food and wine as they were enchanted by the artist’s explanation of his work and his world, which centers in the South of France.

In the words of Goethe, “Thinking is more interesting than knowing, but less interesting than looking.” Gallery patrons inspected the meticulously crafted archaeology of Brisson’s work, only to stand in awe moments later once they comprehended the history that informed his work.  It was at this point that Brisson would connect with them and explain his inspiration behind the work.  He took great joy in learning from his admirers what they thought of the paintings, and what it meant to them.

World renowned art critic, Donald Kuspit, commetnts that “Brisson’s works have a certain classical calm and completeness even as they are informed by a modernist aesthetic. Brisson has roots in both the French decorative tradition, with what might be called its grand sensuous manner, and in modernist Primitivism, with its aggressive emotionality and forthright expressiveness.”  He goes on to say, “Brisson’s dancers are not Degas’ “little rats” nor Matisse’s naked “rustics,” not vulgar urban dancers struggling to be theatrically suave, nor percussive and perverse Stravinsky-like orgiasts; but rather figures who are not entirely at home in their white dresses – suggesting their purity and innocence – nor in their naked flesh, for they have been “corrupted,” as it were by Western ideal of dance art.”

Brisson combines various elements of life, which we have all observed in different moments. Yet, except through his art, never before have they been experienced at a single instant and place. His motifs imbue the awesomeness of the natural world and the unfinished continuum of human history, continuing to unfold.  With their well-aged patina and Mediterranean glow, Brisson’s works are reminiscent of the fresh, early frescos from Pompeii and offer viewers a site of visual pleasure, existing across time.  The harmony and vision of Brisson’s work continues to transcend modes of contemporary culture while carrying the air of  an old world aesthetic.  A master of unearthing the primordial instincts of freedom and expression, Brisson’s work will continue to fascinate and delight the fancy in all of us and grant reverence to the human spirit.  Atlanta’s euphoric embrace of Brisson’s “In the Mood of Matisse” underscored the Southern sensibility of his work as it forged a unique bridge between  the classic and the contemporary.

Kevin Archer’s Enigmatic Undulations of Color

“My paintings invite viewers to imaginatively participate; like looking at the clouds and seeing the head of a lion,” says Kevin Archer of his abstract paintings – better described as freeze frame images of moving paint.

Kevin Archer - Untitled, Acrylic on Canvas 52"x95"

Kevin Archer – Untitled, Acrylic on Canvas 52″x95″

Archer creates his master pieces via the exploration of liquid animation, quintessentially a process of manipulating wet paint into more wet paint. His canvases are a saturation of colors that intertwine with one another rhythmically; the actively flying and floating biomorphic forms are suggestive of human, animal, and microcosmic shapes. They are busy colliding, overlapping, and engaging each other in an imaginary landscape space, frozen in a moment of time.

Perhaps, the biggest draw to Archer’s paintings is the multiple detailed vignettes that come into play when one takes a closer look at each of his creations. Consequently, welcoming the viewer to experience the dynamic aspects of the work – the paintings also encourage engagement, making them an interactive visual coalesce.  Due to the purely abstract nature of his work, the viewer’s experience of the piece is constantly changing; this unique dialogue between the admirer and the canvas can be rightfully termed as ephemeral. The paintings can be experienced as meditations in color, form, and energy, as well as compositional arrangements of suggestive imagery. The imagery in the paintings invites an imaginative participation, a moment in which the viewer is propelled into a cosmic ultra-world of color. In essence Archer’s work serves as an oxymoronic experience – the paintings represent a freeze frame of a moment in time; however the viewer’s experience is anything but static.

Archer has taken time to master his process of creation. According to Bill Lowe, “Archer’s work has a universal appeal; his luxurious application of paint creates enigmatic undulations of color on the canvas and almost always lures the admirer in for a closer look.” Bill Lowe Gallery has proudly showcased his work for more than a year, and we are excited for our patrons to experience his work once more as it will be exhibited alongside Pierre-Marie Brisson’s on the 4th of April 2014.

Pierre Marie Brisson – In the Mood of Matisse 04/04/14

Parisian Painter Pierre-Marie Brisson Channels the “Mood of Matisse” to Southern Sensibilities with Atlanta Debut on 04-04-14 at Bill Lowe Gallery

Pierre Marie Brisson - Welcome Mixed Media on Canvas 59x69"

Pierre Marie Brisson – Welcome, Mixed Media on Canvas 59×69″

Bill Lowe Gallery is proud to present a breathtaking compilation of new works by internationally-acclaimed French painter Pierre-Marie Brisson.  Brisson’s southern debut follows the smashing success of his shows in San Francisco and New York and opens on Friday, 04-04-14, from 6PM to 9 PM.

Pierre-Marie Brisson was born in Orleans, France in 1955, and works out of his studio in the South of France. Brisson was initially intrigued by art at the tender age of fourteen.  Though he worked in a variety of non art positions, he eventually devoted his life to his passion for contemporary art.  Brisson studied with painter Bernard Saby during his teenage years, and then settled in Paris in 1979 to study with James Coignard, Antoni Clave, Joan Miro, and Antoni Tapies. These influences are apparent in his painting style, which is often compared to cave painting.

The simplicity of the images used are intended to contrast with the textured elements in his work, to give the impression of being both timeless as well as chic and current. Brisson’s work is held in the private collections of the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, San Francisco Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale Jewish Museum, New York’s George Page Museum, Paris’ Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris Musee de la Poste, Paris Pushkin Museum, Moscow’s Musee Faure, haute couture Paris Groupe Cartier, and the Argentina Musee de L’Hospice Saint-Roch, among many others.

Prominent gallerist Bill Lowe of Bill Lowe Gallery comments that “Brisson’s works capture the imagination of an immense audience that is inspired by their aura of European art history conveyed with an invigorated freshness.  The works possess a uniformly exquisite topography or surface development that underscores the classical lineage of the imagery in these icons to love and a joie de vivre.”

Atlanta – A Global Arts Incubator

“Is Atlanta a global arts incubator? How can we make Atlanta an incubator of global arts?” – Questions such as these echo through Bill Lowe Gallery often. For some the answers are obvious, and for others it is a matter of much heated debate. To be able to answer these questions one must first scrutinize Atlanta’s tormented history and then delve into its current situation.

Atlanta is the largest city in North America to be completely destroyed by war; thus it is a relatively new city as compared to other cultural metropolises around the world – some of which have hundreds or even thousands of years of history and culture to build upon.  Still, Atlanta’s arts scene is bursting at the seams; with gallerists such as Bill Lowe, Fay Gold, and Timothy Tew, just to name a few, as well as the presence of SCAD and the High Museum of Art incessantly pushing the envelope where the realm of fine arts is concerned.

Bill Addressing the Artists of the Fine Arts Atelier

Bill Lowe Addressing the Artists of the Fine Arts Atelier

“The success of art is driven by money and real estate. When the real estate market collapsed the art market followed along with it. If people have no walls to hang the art there is no need to purchase it,” asserted Michael David, founder of the Fine Arts Atelier. The pulse of a city’s real estate market is a great predictor of, and contributor to, the city’s art scene – and Atlanta’s real estate market is thriving. However, the arts community severely lacks the funding that it needs to truly flourish. Typically, when large entities such as corporations make sizable investments in Southern cities like Atlanta, Houston, Dallas and Miami they go to the sports teams and other activities that are unrelated to the arts.

Government also plays an integral role in the cultivating of the arts community, as locale specific spending could encourage galleries and artists to flourish in the commercial arena. Atlanta’s art scene, although vast, is somewhat complicated as there are several art niches all over the city, contrary to New York or Miami where the bulk of the art community is present in a singular place. It would do well for city if the gallerists were to coexist in a centralized location; a collective effort would more readily enable Atlanta to become a force to be reckoned with by the global arts community.

Fine Arts Atelier Artists' Talk

Fine Arts Atelier Artists’ Talk

Furthermore, it is noteworthy to highlight the power of art within the initiative of the unification of the city: Art brings people together, and when people come together they stand stronger and taller. This phenomenon is beautifully illustrated by the Fine Arts Atelier, Michael David brought together a range of artists, these artists then grew together and were able to participate in a group show at Bill Lowe Gallery. The opening was jam packed, and from the opening sprung the idea of having an artist talk – which attracted even more people. It is undeniable that the Atlanta arts community is gaining momentum toward the unification of its disjointed art scene; once the art niches coalesce Atlanta’s place in the global art scene will be one of awe.

The popular consensus at the Artists talk was one of community and pride. We must make it known that we are an arts incubator, and we will become an arts and culture epicenter.  As the widely recognized “capital of the South”, this is Atlanta’s destiny. This future will only be possible with Atlanta morphing into a tight-knit-art-based community, fueled by the support of government, corporate entities, and most of all the universal and unfathomable spirit of the arts.

Cord of Three – Loss, Anguish, and Redemption

I have lived all my life in Georgia and during my years here I have seen the South embrace a multitude of transformations, one of which has taken place within me.  At the tender age of 19 I joined the workforce and steadily climbed the corporate ladder, I worked hard and attended the school of hard knocks and I excelled. From this experience I took many positive lifelong lessons that have been integral to not only my success in business, but my personal life as well.

As a young girl I had an engulfing desire to be creative; whether drawing images in the clouds, daydreaming in a classroom or getting my hands into something I could attack, destroy and then make beautiful.  Over the years I took art classes here and there when I could, but being a single mom and needing a steady income I could not seriously pursue my artistic career until 5 years ago.  In 2011 I started working under the tutelage of Michael David; this experience has been life changing for me.  Michael not only opened my mind to a higher level of understanding and creativity, but he believed in me and challenged me to do the same.

It is my belief that if your work ethics are solid and you truly love what you are doing; the integrity of your work will show through.  My paintings do not become “real” until I feel a personal connection to them.  I choose materials such as the wedding gown I wore when I was a bride at 17; dirt from specific places as far away as Minnesota; hot wax, oils, charcoal and even tar at times. I work with materials that demonstrate my vital spark.  I respect the act of painting as well as the fight to find resolution in each story.

Cord of Three

Cord of Three – Oil and Wax on Canvas 72″x48″

My work represents a direct metaphor of my life, and how faith has helped me triumph over great adversity.  Whether painting Figures or Landscapes, the themes of loss, anguish and redemption are a common thread in the soul of my work.  We have all gone through personal challenges, but it is how you cope and heal that is a true testament to your character.  One of the greatest gifts I’ve received is the lesson on how to forgive.  To forgive does not necessarily mean that you have to forget, to forgive means to move gracefully past the hurt, pain, and destruction. To truly forgive one must fill the voids with positive energy which is cultivated from experiences; it is the illustration of this strength in my work that can impart on others the wisdom to not be forever stagnant in their pain.

The women in my work are not victims but survivors; warriors that have fought hard for a brighter way and a better quality of life.  My landscapes are also based on the same principles; after illness, loss, or violence there should be a time for healing, cleansing, and grace, as well as acceptance of the things that one cannot change – with that acceptance comes the power of growth.

On October 11, 2013, after three years of excruciatingly hard work I was humbled to have my first SOLO show at Bill Lowe Gallery.  To be presented in such a sophisticated environment, alongside great artists through the gallery was truly a rewarding experience.  My involvement with Bill Lowe and his staff has been remarkable, and I am appreciative to be a part of a gallery with this caliber. Moreover I am touched that the gallery believes in my work and continually supports my success as an artist.

Ellen DeLoach