installation

Diving for Sculpture

It’s not every day that I come across a piece of art and am mesmerized by it. When I saw Jason Taylor’s underwater sculpture, it was one of those days.

Something as simple as submerging sculptures in the ocean is immediately poignant and poetic; he literally shifts context into another form of matter and as a result, is cultivating beauty in a different dimension than the previously programmed “art reality”.

Over time, his works develop into artificial coral reefs. Taylor integrates his skills as a conservationist, underwater photographer and scuba diving instructor to produce unique installations that encourage the habitation and growth of corals and marine life. His early work is located in the world´s first public underwater sculpture park in Molinere Bay, Grenada, West Indies.

And more recently, his most ambitious project to date is the creation of the world’s largest underwater sculpture museum, MUSA, situated off the coast of Cancun and the western coast of Isla Mujeres. Works in the museum include Hombre en llamas (Man on Fire )La Jardinera de la Esperanza (The Gardener of Hope)El Colecionista de los Sueños (The Dream Collector) and La Evolución Silenciosa (The Silent Evolution).

Just one more reason for me to learn how to scuba dive!

Casting The Invisible


Yasuaki Onishi
, who is known for his art throughout Japan and internationally, currently has an installation on exhibit in the Rice Gallery in  titled, ‘Reverse of Volume RG’. On display until June 24, he uses plastic sheeting and black hot glue to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. In using these simple materials, he is able to successfully meditate on the nature of the negative space, or void, left behind.

The process that he calls ‘casting the invisible’ involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. Onishi wanted to create an installation that would change as visitors approached and viewed it from outside of the glass wall to inside the gallery space. Seen through the glass, the undulating, exterior surface and dense layers of vertical black strands are primarily visible.

Almost like stepping into an inner sanctum or cave-like chamber, the semi-translucent plastic sheeting and wispy strands of hot glue envelop the viewer in a fragile, tent-like enclosure speckled with inky black marks. Visitors can walk in and out of the contemplative space, observing how the simplest qualities of light, shape, and line change.

[via Arch Daily]

Our High Wire Act: An Opening at BLG

Planning for an opening is a daunting task, a flurry of activity that begins months before the event. After previewing a large body of work from the artist, Bill and the staff select favorites and begin conceptualizing an overall theme around the work. For example, our upcoming exhibit entitled Sacred Portal is a sophisticated reference to the work’s carnal subject.

Titles don’t just pop out of thin air; in fact, our last show, The Irascible Muse: A Coming of Age and Fried Green Tomatoes, started with over 2 hours of discussion, brainstorming, and some random word associations until we were absolutely delirious. We took a break and the next day got it just right with a comical twist at the end.

Then there’s inventory, installation, wall tags, marketing and of course the great opening night party! The work arrives to the gallery (normally a week or two before the opening) and it is time for our wonderful, and might I say charming, installers to do some heavy lifting. Uncrating, placing , installing and lighting the work can take up to a week.

 

Bill works his curatorial magic as he strips the gallery to make room for new. Next, the gallery girls to inventory, tag, photograph, and properly document everything with pricing, materials and dimensions. Changes are still made up until the day before opening night to make sure the work makes just the right impact and that the client’s eye will move in a harmonious rhythm from object to object and idea to idea.

If you receive our invitations by mail or email you have become quite familiar with the graphic brilliance of Madame Kwan (prime example below).

Marketing is a coordinated effort and Alex Delotch Davis has her foot tapping in it all. We call all of our favorite journalists, print, online, radio and television, with what we think is the most interesting story in the world (sometimes they agree). We load up the car and hand deliver invitations to our favorite restaurants, design firms, and boutiques to share with their preferred clients. We push email blasts, twitter, facebook, and every other social media that connects us with the world. All to get the right people in the right place at the right time.

Finally opening night: food, wine, flowers, and music all arranged somewhere between uncrating and tweeting. It’s the final element of pizzazz trademark of any BILL LOWE event. For the Pierre Le Duc opening Bill and the staff selected light spring inspired food that would not overpower one’s palette. For the flowers white and lush seemed to be the perfect echo to Pierre’s monumental white linen canvases. As for the music, Florence and the Machines is included amongst our usual upbeat tunes.

 

[Flowers by Twelve and Catering by Soiree]

It’s a real high wire act keeping all the parts moving. What seems like a tranquil, ambient gallery space is underscored by lots of shuffle and buzz that keeps people coming back for more!